Stressed about work? You must live in Florida

 

 7 things to know today

Good morning, !

Lately, it seems like everywhere you turn, someone is talking about — or offering advice on — how to deal with stress.

Stress levels nationwide have been rising for many demographics since their low point in 2016. Common stressors include the future of America and money, along with uncertainty about health care. But not all demographics are affected in the same way. For example, women’s stress levels rose in the past year while men’s actually dropped.

So to determine the Most & Least Stressed States, WalletHub analyzed 38 key indicators of stress to determine the places to avoid and achieve a more relaxing life. The dataset ranges from average hours worked per week to personal bankruptcy rate and share of adults getting adequate sleep.

Here in the Sunshine State, we scored in the good range for family-related stress (No. 6), health and safety-related stress (No. 20) and money-related stress (No. 22), but not so good when it comes to work-related stress (No. 37). That gave us an overall ranking of No. 16 on the list.

It turns out that Louisiana is the least stressful state, while Minnesota is the most stressful place to live. See the full data here.

And be sure to check out these other Thursday headlines:

A New York-based development group wants to build three apartment towers in Orlando’s bustling downtown. More here on what’s next for the developer and what the project will include.

Here’s how many jobs Orlando added

The Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford MSA added 6,200 construction jobs between February 2017 to February 2018, a new report from Associated General Contractors of America shows. In all, construction employment increased in 257 out of 358 metro areas in that time frame, declined in 50 and stagnated in 51. See the metro data here and state data here.

SpaceX launches RemoveDebris experiment on Falcon 9 rocket

The Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule spacecraft that Elon Musk-owned rocket company SpaceX launched from Cape Canaveral to the International Space Station on April 2 carried a high-tech experiment designed to help bust down the many small pieces of material floating in low Earth orbit that can hinder future space travel. .

Orange County tourist tax collections up in February

Orange County tourist tax collections for the month of February totaled $23,813,900, an 8.9% increase over the year-ago period. Tourist taxes are charged on short-term rentals, mostly hotels and motels. Year-to-date, collections through February total $114,756,700, a 10.7% increase over a year ago.

The Walt Disney Co. plans to launch ESPN+, its new sports-focused subscription streaming service, on April 12. ESPN+, its first direct-to-consumer TV service and will give fans a “dynamic” lineup of live sports, original content and on-demand programming for a subscription price of $4.99 per month.

Delta Air Lines hit by data breach

Delta Air Lines — one of the largest carriers at Orlando International Airport — said it is investigating a data breach involving a company, [24]7.ai, that provides online chat services for it and other companies. Delta said in a statement that the breach, which occurred from Sept. 26 to Oct. 12, 2017, involved “certain customer payment information.” It did not say how many customers may have been affected.

OIA tackles potential development of 1,300 acres

Orlando International Airport is looking at the potential of its east airfield for future expansion and overall growth.

 

The Greater Aviation Authority, the entity that oversees the airport, has teamed up with real estate firm Jones LangLaSalle Inc. to look at how 1,342 acres of airport-owned vacant land can be developed in the near future. The land, bought by the airport over several decades dating back to 1986, is prime for developments that cater to operations such as fuel storage, training, distribution and logistics, warehouses or other airport-related needs.

“Our original purpose was to acquire this property to expand if needed and to provide aviation opportunities for support uses that would generate jobs,” Phil Brown, executive director with the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority, told Orlando Journal. “Our whole intent, which goes back to one of our main goals in economic development, is to use that property to bring new jobs to the airport and generate non-aviation revenue, which accounts for 30 percent of the airport’s [$518.2 million] budget.”

There’s no timeline for when the land will be developed and leased out, but Brown said he is ready to hear proposals. He said the airport constantly is growing and the available land is a major asset for that growth. “They are not making any more land,” he said, noting other airports in Florida are mostly landlocked.

Orlando International Airport is looking at how it can use more than 1,300 acres for future development.
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Orlando International Airport is looking at how it can use more than 1,300 acres for future development.
Most of the 1,300-plus acres is useable — roughly 1,100 acres — with the rest designated as wetlands. The land also is near access points for the airport and highway systems that would make it ideal for most users who need to transport cargo or other large bulk items.

The airport also may use some of the vacant land for its own operations, including storage for materials for the $2.15 billion south terminal project, which is underway and slated to be done by 2020. However, one type of development that’s not on the radar is any residential type of project, such as or apartments, as the goal is to use the land to enhance airport operations.

This move coincides with the airport’s already massive growth plans that include more than $3 billion in new development and upgrades. The airport welcomes more than 44 million passengers and counting each year, thanks to Orlando’s $60 billion tourism industry that continues to invest in new attractions, hotels, and other offerings. Central Florida draws 68 million-plus tourists to the region each year.

New owner grabs stake in Orlando City Soccer Club

 

Orlando’s Major League Soccer franchise will have a new face in its ownership meetings.

The team announced via its website on March 28 that Canadian investor Albert Friedberg, who is associated with investment firm FCMI Parent Co., would join the leadership spearheaded by Flavio Augusto da Silva, majority owner of Orlando City Soccer Club. The team, which is entering its fourth year of operation, played its first MLS game in 2015 and has been surging in popularity since.

“We have taken the opportunity to become partners with an experienced and strategic investor in Albert, who, in addition to financial contributions, brings strong business and finance knowledge to help with projects that lie ahead for the improvement of our product on and off the field,” said Flávio Augusto da Silva, majority owner of Orlando City SC, in a prepared statement.

Friedberg acquired 8.63 percent stake of Orlando City Soccer Club, which amounts to roughly $42.33 million, according to ESPN.

Here’s more on Friedberg from the team’s news release:

Friedberg is the founder and president of Friedberg Mercantile Group Ltd., a Toronto-based investment firm. He is the principal strategist of the firm and is the sole manager of two mutual funds that bear his name. In addition, he serves as chairman and president of the FCMI group of companies, his family holding entities, which are involved in a wide range of investments that include real estate, mining and forestry operations.

Orlando City Soccer Club, a finalist in Round 3 of OBJ’s 2018 Brand Madness competition, has become a staple in the region’s sports culture. The franchise, alongside its sibling teams, the National Women Soccer League’s Orlando Pride and United Soccer League’s Orlando City B, has proven that the market is still hungry for more sports.

Sports are big economic tools for a region as teams can help to draw new residents, encourage new development and overall economic growth.

Lake Nona City Park Details – East Airfield and Laureate City Parks

News » Features » Lake Nona City Park Details – East Airfield and Laureate City Parks

 

 

 

 

 

Two new parks are breaking ground in Lake Nona on Thursday, September 7th, 2017. Laureate City Park and East Airfield City Park will both be completed in 2018 and provide Lake Nona residents great options for fun, exercise, and relaxation. We’ll have more details after the groundbreaking ceremony.

Mayor Buddy Dyer and District 1 Commissioner Jim Gray will join with Development Company leaders and community members for the official groundbreaking ceremony for two new city parks in the City of Orlando’s fastest growing community, Tavistock’s Lake Nona. Both parks are planned to open in Summer 2018.

In the northern portion of Lake Nona along Dowden Road and nearby Lake Nona’s Northlake Park neighborhood, East Airfield Park will include four ball fields; a softball field, Babe Ruth/Pony field and two Little League fields with spectator bleachers, a scoreboard and lighting for evening games. In addition, a central pavilion will provide a shaded concession area and restrooms. The park will also include a playground and trails that link you to Lake Nona’s 44-mile trail system.

Further to the south within Lake Nona’s neighborhood, Laureate City Park will include four multi-purpose fields, a practice area, fitness station, playground and pavilion, concession building, and trails along with ample parking. Laureate City Park will be located at the intersection of Hartwell Road and Kellogg Avenue – within walking distance of the new OCPS Laureate Park Elementary School.

Margaritaville Resort Orlando has paradise under construction

 

Paradise isn’t built in a day, but Margaritaville Resort Orlando is trying to get it done by this summer.

The $750 million, a 300-acre resort in Osceola County has under a 180-room Margaritaville hotel, 1,000 resort vacation cottages, 300 timeshare units and a 12-acre, multimillion-dollar water park. As such, the resort held a behind-the-scenes construction tour of the property with media on March 26 that showed the latest work.

Primarily, the resort’s 1,000-plus vacation cottages are well underway on construction with the first 25 units set to be ready by July. The next 25 units, which will be built in 25 increments, will begin construction immediately at the completion of the previous 25 cottages.

“We have 25 railed up and you will see those coming up shortly. The concept is that we have six different islands or villages of about 200 each. We are trying to have every home be unique with no duplicates,” Jim Bagley, managing director of project developer Encore Capital Management, told  Journal, noting that the resort will have at least 300 homes finished every year.

Also, underway is the new Margaritaville hotel, which has two wings of about 90 rooms apiece. The hotel’s drywall is being installed on the western wing of the hotel with plans for those rooms to be completed by December. The hotel’s east wing currently is installing exterior framing and is running about 30 days behind the west wing, but Bagley said both of the hotel’s wings should be done at the same time for the late holiday season.

Amenities at the hotel include s 5,000-square-foot kids’ club and fitness center, a 2,500-square-foot food and beverage outlet and a 10,000-square-foot, zero-entry beach lagoon that will open by July.

“Right now the building shells and ironworks are being built on those amenities. We are also in good shape for the first pools. We expect to have 5,000 renters here on the weekend and we need to have pools to accommodate that, so the amenities will be able to accommodate 1,000 people apiece,” Bagley added.

As for the 200,000-square-foot retail center, space is filling up as tenants keep singing on. Tenants include Studio Movie Grill, GameTime, a Rascal Flatts restaurant, a KISS Rock & Brews, Skechers, Bahama Bucks Original Shaved Ice Co., Avalon Day Spa, Café Rio, Cold Stone Creamery, Paradise Spirits & Wine and BurgerFi.

Margaritaville Resort Orlando is expected to radically transform Kissimmee’s iconic U.S. Highway 192 tourist corridor when it opens later this year. The resort will boost Central ‘s lodging and activities and should spur more capital investment here. Orlando’s $60 billion tourism industry — the region’s main economic engine — draws 68 million visitors annually.

Millennial homebuyers are not actively seeking

 

Good morning, Orlando!

Millennial homebuyers are not actively seeking to buy a house in Orlando, according to a new study by LendingTree.

In fact, out of the 100 cities ranked, Orlando came in at No. 80. See the data here.

Mortgage requests for buyers under 35 were analyzed between Feb. 1, 2017, and Feb. 1, 2018, then ranked alongside data about the average age of the buyer under 35, credit score, down payment and requested loan amount.

The study found cities in the Sun Belt like Las Vegas, Tuscon, Ariz., and five Florida cities as least popular, which could be because of their popularity instead with retirees, as well as high cost of living, according to LendingTree.

About one-third of mortgage requests through the company were from those 35 years old and younger.

And be sure to check out these other Monday headlines:

New project with shops, may be on tap for the area near SunRail station
A South Florida developer is eyeing 18 acres near the SunRail station in southwest Orlando for a possible mixed-use development. The project would include apartments, townhomes and a two-story office-and-retail building on Sand Lake Road and Orange Avenue. More here.

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
Images revealed of apartment buildings at Disney’s Flamingo Crossings
Rendering of the community center at Flamingo Crossings

Online mortgage lender expands into Florida, seeks to disrupt the industry
Lenda, an online mortgage company that claims it can close home loans 3.5 times faster than the industry average is expanding into Florida. Lenda uses a predictive algorithm, rather than going through human loan officers, to determine whether a borrower is creditworthy. More here.

N.C. food production biz considers adding 95 jobs in Melbourne
MG Foods Inc., a North Carolina-based food production, packaging, and distribution company, has applied for property tax breaks with Brevard County in order to expand its workforce by 95 jobs, Florida Today reports. More here.

How to get a piece of the work on the next phase of OIA’s new terminal
Orlando International Airport is looking for some help as it plans the next phase of its $2.15 billion expansion. The Orlando airport — the busiest airport in the state — is a huge driver of the area’s and the new south terminal will raise its capacity by 10 million passengers. More here.

Mortgage rates hold steady
Mortgage rates held steady this week, according to Freddie Mac. The 30-year fixed mortgage averaged 4.45% for the week ending March 22, essentially unchanged from 4.44% the previous week. Favorable mortgage rates have helped propel U.S. home sales and the refinance market.

And higher gas prices are on the way
Expect higher gas prices this week, AAA says. The Florida average has risen 10 of the past 12 days, climbing a total of 6 cents. You can expect prices to climb at least another 10 cents in the coming weeks. Gas prices in Orlando currently average $2.48 a gallon.

Airport exec shares more on Brightline’s timeline, plans

 

 

All Aboard Florida’s -to-Miami Brightline passenger train is making progress with the Orlando International Airport portion of its route.

The $3.5 billion Brightline train will soon be moving into the airport’s Intermodal Terminal Facility where it, along with SunRail and an undetermined light rail, will be housed.

Stan Thornton, Greater Orlando Aviation Authority COO, said the crew will be moving in as early as next week. “They are going to start setting up in their office in the Intermodal Terminal Facility that they’ve been constructing out. Planning and engineering officers are going to be down in there,” said Thornton.

Thornton added that with the latest conversations between the airport and Brightline officials, it looks like they will be ready to start on the property in June/July where there will be physical construction on the airport’s property. “What they’ve told us is that from the time they actually start, they have a 30-month construction schedule to get that done,” Thornton said.

The timeline sets it up for Orlando’s leg to be operational by the end of 2020 or the beginning of 2021. But there’s still a lot of work to do before then.

“They have a lot of work to do for mass grading. They are going to be coming down from State Road 528, and they are going to be coming to our property from past Narcoossee Road through Lake Nona. They start to come on the property on the northern edge underneath Goldenrod Road. All of that has to be mass graded,” Thornton said.

The only part of the route that hasn’t been built out to have rail go underneath it is the Cargo Road interchange with the Jeff Fuqua Boulevard exit to the north. Thornton said there will be a reconstruction of those bridges and ramps in that area so that they can get the train underneath there and continue down underneath the north cross-field taxiway. Plus, there will be a need to fill in the ponds.

The Intermodal Terminal Facility itself is already prepared for Brightline.

However, the first goal of Brightline will be to get its 70-acre Vehicle Maintenance Facility built on Orlando International Airport property. Once that’s up, Brightline can assemble all its locomotives and cars, and work the rail line route back to South Florida.

The entire Brightline route will cover 235 miles.

The train started operations in January connecting from West Palm Beach to Fort Lauderdale.

For a look inside the Brightline train, check out sister paper South Florida Journal‘s gallery.

Hospital CEO shares why Lake Nona foothold is big part of its long-term plan

 

 

Hospital has been trying to grow its Lake Nona presence for quite some time — and now, its top executive revealed a little more about that strategy.

Florida Hospital President CEO Daryl Tol, who also serves as senior executive vice president of parent Adventist Health System, talked to  Journal about plans for 80-plus acres of land it owns in the fast-growing southeast Orlando community.

And moving quickly on these plans likely will be important for the hospital system, since it no longer is in the running to take over the assets of the 175,000-square-foot Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in Lake Nona’s 650-acre Medical City.

Rather, the hospital system is more focused on what it will do with the vacant land it owns in the area.

is an important part of our long-term plan,” Tol said. “We do not have a final plan as to what we will build build but we know that community is going to grow significantly, and it’s going to be important in in our network to have our services there.”

Florida Hospital likely will start with physicians and outpatient services, move on to emergency services and eventually hospitals as the population grows, Tol said.

Adventist Health System/Sunbelt began assembling a big chunk of land in Lake Nona with a 67.24-acre site it purchased in 2016, and then followed that up late last year with another roughly 15 acres on Narcoossee Road on the north and south sides of Lake Nona Boulevard — the latter of which it bought from Lake Nona’s developer, Group, as previously reported by OBJ.

The site is approved for up to 145,000 square feet of medical offices, a freestanding emergency department, an outpatient surgery center, and health and wellness services such as chiropractic services, general physical therapy and rehabilitation services, according to Orange County documents.

“We plan many years out into the future and we look across our entire map and we realized that even before areas have grown to a point where we would build certain services we need to make sure we have a good plan for acquiring property,” Tol told OBJ. “We are very systematic in the way purchase land. Sometime we hold it for a number of years as communities grow and sometimes we build something immediately on the land.

“So you’re going to see us continue to acquire properties around Central Florida based on our longterm plan.”

In fact, Florida Hospital’s parent since last December bought more than 120 acres in Central Florida for future development.

But the 17-square-mile Lake Nona community is a priority for many big companies and organizations. Lake Nona notched the No. 15 spot among the nation’s top-selling master-planned communities with 523 home sales in 2017, John Burns Real Estate Consulting reported. Additionally, the community already boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees, plenty of new activity in the 300-acre Sports & Performance District, and more than 11,000 students at its schools.

Florida Hospital earlier this year was competing with the University of Central Florida to win the assets of Sanford Burnham, which expects to wind down operations. But the hospital system withdrew its proposal after it was publicly revealed that Florida Hospital had an agreement with Sanford Burnham that was unbeknownst to Orange County officials and other stakeholders.

Drive Shack’s planning at its Lake Nona location

7 things to know today!

Good morning, Orlando!

Since New York-based global golf entertainment company Drive Shack Inc. (NYSE: DS) will debut its $20 million-$25 million golf-themed driving range and entertainment complex in Lake Nona later this spring, you might be wondering if there will be any unique features at the new location.

Wonder no more: CEO Sarah Watterson talked with OBJ about how Drive Shack’s Orlando site will take fun to a whole new level with the most advanced technology in the business, as well as exceptional food and drink options.

What’s planned for $500M+ former Flea World redevelopment

The 111-acre site that once housed Seminole County’s iconic Flea World soon may begin its transformation into a new mixed-use project centered around nature. More here on what’s being envisioned for the site.

Lockheed Martin, SAAB Defense & Security win a combined $607M in contracts

A couple of global defense firms were awarded big U.S. military contracts for work on F-35 parts and U.S. Army training support, according a report from the U.S. Department of Defense. And some of that work that will take place in Orlando. More here.

Valet parking firm to cut nearly 100 workers

AAA Parking, an Atlanta valet and event parking services company, plans to lay off 99 employees on April 30 at sister properties Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek and Waldorf Astoria Orlando, according to a notice filed with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.

Images revealed of planned apartment buildings at Disney’s Flamingo Crossings

Walt Disney Imagineering Research & Development Inc.’s related Flamingo Crossings LLC on March 19 filed an application and land-use plan in Orange County that included renderings and elevations of its “Flamingo Crossings West,” the nearly 1,300 apartment units planned for 93.3 acres south of Flagler Avenue called “Flamingo Crossings West.” More here.

A new study from Wallet Hub shows Florida ranks slightly below average for property taxes, coming in at No. 27 among the 50 states. Here in the Sunshine State, we pay on average $1,702 in real estate taxes on a median-priced home. See the full report here.

Gas prices rise in time for spring break

Gas prices are on the rise once again, after declining for nearly two weeks, AAA reports. The most expensive gas price averages in Florida are in West Palm Beach-Boca Raton ($2.65), while the cheapest can be found in Punta Gorda ($2.48).

KPMG’s revamped plans for Lake Nona center

 

 

 

 

 

Good morning, Orlando!

New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP is revamping the plans for its 55-acre training center.

If you recall, KPMG received $3.8 million in economic development incentives for the training center project, including $3.5 million in tax rebates from Florida and the city of Orlando for a seven-year period and a $320,000 Qualified Target Industries tax refund through the state, which is expected to create 80 jobs by 2019.

More here on what KPMG is requesting approval from the city to change.

The new KPMG center is expected to boost the local by bringing thousands of employees into the market, creating new jobs at the facility and hundreds of third-party contract operator positions.

And be sure to check out these other Thursday headlines:

Hard Rock HQ’s Orlando departure to result in 184 layoffs

Orlando-based casino, hotel and restaurant operator Hard Rock International Inc. told the state via a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification notice, that it will lay off 184 workers starting in April through July. The company said the layoffs will be permanent. More here.

First look: Lake Nona teaching hospital plans reveal future expansion

The University of Central Florida and HCA Healthcare’s application for a new teaching hospital in Lake Nona gave a first look of the new facility and the medical spaces it will create. More here.

Orlando ‘Shark Tank’ star to roll out products in Walmart this month

Hummus king Jesse Wolfe has scored one his largest deals yet. His company O’Dang Hummus, featured on CNBC’s show “Shark Tank,” last summer struck a deal with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (NYSE: WMT). And now, he will roll out his hummus salad dressing in 2,000 Walmart stores and neighborhood markets this month.

Ridership of Brightline — which eventually will extend to Central Florida — has exceeded expectations since the train began service between Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, CEO Patrick Goddard told an audience at the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce luncheon Wednesday. More here.

Florida House Speaker Corcoran says budget deal reached

House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O’ Lakes, indicated Wednesday afternoon that legislative leaders have reached agreement on a budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1. More here.

Disney opens StudioLAB to build VR, AI ‘entertainment experiences’

Walt Disney Studios is launching an initiative dedicated to virtual reality and artificial intelligence. StudioLAB will reimagine, design and prototype entertainment experiences and production capabilities to promote feature films, as well as music and stage plays.