NAR Pending Home Sales Report

WASHINGTON (August 29, 2018) — Pending home sales stepped back in July and have now fallen on an annual basis for seven straight months, according to the National Association of Realtors®.

The Pending Home Sales Index, a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, decreased 0.7 percent to 106.2 in July from 107.0 in June. With last month’s decline, contract signings are now down 2.3 percent year-over-year.

Lawrence Yun, the NAR chief economist, says the housing market’s summer slowdown continued in July. “Contract signings inched backward once again last month, as declines in the South and West weighed down on overall activity,” he said. “It’s evident in recent months that many of the most overheated real estate markets – especially those out West – are starting to see a slight decline in home sales and slower price growth.”

Added Yun, “The reason sales are falling off last year’s pace is that multiple years of inadequate supply in markets with strong job growth have finally driven up home prices to a point where an increasing number of prospective buyers are unable to afford it.”

https://goo.gl/AFukQb

Pointing to annual changes in active listings data at realtor. com®, Yun said increasing inventory in several large metro areas, and especially many out West, will likely help cool price growth to more affordable levels going forward. Even as days on market remains swift in many of these areas, Denver, Santa Rosa, California, San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California, Seattle, Nashville, Tennessee, and Portland, Oregon was among the large markets seeing a rise in active listings in July compared to a year ago.

Earlier this week, NAR released commentary reflecting on the past decade since the beginning of the Great Recession. Although supply and headwinds are the biggest issue right now, Yun said it is important to note just how much the housing market has recovered since the depths of the financial crisis. Today, thanks to several years of solid job growth, as well as safe lending and regulatory policy reforms, foreclosures sit near historic lows and record high home values have helped millions of households build substantial wealth.

“Rising inventory levels – especially if new home finally starts picking up – should help slow price appreciation to around two-and-four percent, which will help aspiring first-time buyers, and be good for the long-term health of the nation’s housing market,” said Yun.

Yun expects existing-home sales this year to decrease 1.0 percent to 5.46 million, and the national median existing-home price to increase around 5.0 percent. Looking ahead to next year, existing sales are forecast to increase 2 percent and home prices around 3.5 percent.

July Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown

The PHSI in the Northeast climbed 1.0 percent to 94.6 in July but is still 2.3 percent below a year ago. In the Midwest, the index inched up 0.3 percent to 102.2 in July but is still 1.5 percent lower than July 2017.

Pending home sales in the South declined 1.7 percent to an index of 122.1 in July, and are 0.9 percent below a year ago. The index in the West decreased 0.9 percent in July to 94.7 and is 5.8 percent below a year ago.

The National Association of Realtors® is America’s largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

# # #

* The Pending Home Sales Index is a leading indicator for the housing sector, based on pending sales of existing . A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is finalized within one or two months of signing.

The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales. In developing the model for the index, it was demonstrated that the level of monthly sales-contract activity parallels the level of closed existing-home sales in the following two months.

An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2001, which was the first year to be examined. By coincidence, the volume of existing-home sales in 2001 fell within the range of 5.0 to 5.5 million, which is considered normal for the current U.S. population.

NOTE: NAR’s August Housing Minute video will be released on August 31, Existing-Home Sales for August will be reported September 20, and the next Pending Home Sales Index will be September 27; all release times are 10:00 a.m. ET.

Property Man – Bob Massi Features Lake Nona and Orlando

features in a recent episode… Not only is Lake Nona and one of the fastest growing cities across the nation, but the here is perfect for . Orlando is used as a meter for the real estate market because of the booming economy and the constant influx of new residents and visitors. In this episode, Bob Massi answers why Orlando is so successful and features Lake Nona and as one of the fasted growing community across the nation. Bob takes a tour around Orlando and Lake Nona to see why the market is so successful. The most important message to take away about Orlando is, as most cities across the nation feel the ups and downs of the economic rollercoaster, Orlando is the first to recover and last to feel the pinch.

Watch as Bob Massi uncovers the reasons why Orlando truly is the city beautiful…

As always… comment, like and share. Your feedback helps us know how to help you better!

-The Maycumber Team of WeKnowOrlando.com

407-251-1314

2018’s Real-Estate Markets

 

Information on the housing markets

Whether you’re joining the real-estate business or just looking for a place to call home, it’s important to get a handle on the housing markets you’re considering before investing in a property. With unemployment falling and house prices rising, the market as a whole has been in a boom. But while home values are rising, up almost $16,000 on average just in the first quarter of 2018, fewer are being built and bought because mortgage rates are rising. However, home prices and rental rates vary widely across the U.S. based on supply and demand.

If you aim for long-term growth, equity and profit, you’ll need to look beyond tangible factors like square footage and style. Those factors certainly drive up property values. From an investor’s standpoint, though, they hold less significance than historical market trends and the economic health of residents.

To determine the best local real-estate markets in the U.S., WalletHub compared 300 cities of varying sizes across 22 key indicators of housing-market attractiveness and economic strength. Our dataset ranges from median home-price appreciation to home sales turnover rate to job growth. Read on for our findings, expert insight from a panel of researchers and a full description of our methodology.

Best Places to Buy a House

http://WWW.WeKnowOrlando.com

Overall rank (1=Best) City Total Score ‘Real-Estate Market’ Rank ‘Affordability & Economic Environment’ Rank
1 Frisco, TX 75.06 8 1
2 McKinney, TX 74.6 7 2
3 Allen, TX 73.93 11 3
4 Santa Clara, CA 73.79 1 247
5 Durham, NC 72.45 5 60
6 Murfreesboro, TN 72.4 10 7
7 Richardson, TX 72.29 12 10
8 Seattle, WA 72.16 3 171
9 Bellevue, WA 72.14 4 142
10 Denton, TX 71.98 9 23
11 Sunnyvale, CA 70.71 2 276
12 Carrollton, TX 70.17 16 24
13 Denver, CO 70.16 6 132
14 Cary, NC 69.39 41 4
15 Fort Worth, TX 69.34 13 88
16 Roseville, CA 69.2 18 37
17 Thornton, CO 69.11 21 30
18 Fort Collins, CO 68.96 19 38
19 Boise, ID 68.95 23 40
20 Aurora, CO 68.86 15 102
21 Irving, TX 68.45 24 62
22 Arvada, CO 68.17 22 82
23 Colorado Springs, CO 68.12 33 26
24 Renton, WA 67.83 17 149
25 Nashville, TN 67.77 29 66
26 Grand Rapids, MI 67.74 25 95
27 Irvine, CA 67.58 40 27
28 Charlotte, NC 67.49 35 42
29 Overland Park, KS 67.41 32 69
30 Longmont, CO 67.32 20 161

Ask the Experts

Economic indicators point to a strong housing market, but does that mean it’s a good time to buy a home? We consulted a panel of experts for their insight. Click on the panelists’ profiles below to read their bios and thoughts on the following key questions:

  1. Is now a good time to buy a home? What economic indicators should potential buyers be watching?
  2. Are foreign buyers driving up the cost of U.S. real estate? Which cities are most affected?
  3. How likely is it that the Federal Reserve will increase interest rates in the coming months? How will this impact the housing market?
  4. Why are Millennials still sitting out of the housing market? What can be done to increase homeownership rates for this cohort?
  5. In evaluating the healthiest housing markets, what are the top five indicators?
  • WaysAICP – Associate Professor and Program Director, MS in Real Estate Development, Jefferson University
  • J. BetancurProfessor, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • AcolinAssistant Professor, University of Washington’s College of Built Environment
  • G. ChernoffProfessor, New York University
  • M. SpringerProfessor of Finance and Real Estate, Department of Finance, Clemson University; President, Faculty Advisory Council and College of Business Faculty and Secretary, American Real Estate Society

 

Orlando OKs conditional plan for $107M Creative Village apartment complex

The City Commission today helped move forward two pieces of the planned $1 billion, 68-acre, mixed-used Creative Village in downtown.

The commissioners voted unanimously during the Sept. 4 city council meeting to give conditional approval of a $107 million, 390-unit apartment complex. The Creative Village Design Review Committee still wants to review certain aspects of the apartment project such as the streetscape, parking, architecture, and appearance, before it gets full approval.

The commissioners also gave full approval for a 9,221-square-foot central cooling system building for the planned Downtown, a campus that will be shared by the University of Central Florida and  College The UCF energy plant building will include condenser water pumps and cooling towers located outside the building. The structure will be the only plant for the downtown campus.

The apartment complex is a joint venture between Orlando-based Ustler Development Inc. — whose related Creative Village Development LLC is the master developer of Creative Village — and Coral Gables-based apartment developer The Allen Morris Co. The project is slated for a 1.6-acre site on the southwest corner of Amelia Street and Terry Avenue, which is known as “parcel M,” according to city documents.

Creative Village is expected to attract 8,000 faculty, staff and students when UCF Downtown opens in fall 2019 — two to three times more people than initially anticipated, according to Ustler Development Inc. President Craig Ustler. The number of apartment units was increased from 250 in the previous plan to 390 in July due to that increased demand.

The apartment complex, which could open by mid-2020, will feature mostly studio and one-bedroom units, each with a washer and dryer. The ground floor has a 6,500-square-foot commercial space that may house a food and a social hall. The project also will include a 570-space parking garage, a public courtyard, and a beer garden, said Ustler.

  • Dallas-based Mill Creek Residential Trust plans to build an estimated $59 million-$90 million, 250- to 300-unit market-rate apartment complex on the east side of Central Park.
  • Ustler Development and Development Ventures Group Inc. are underway on a 15-story, $105 million student-housing project with 600 beds and 105,000 square feet of educational space leased to UCF and Valencia College.
  • Winter Park-based Atlantic Housing Partners LLLP is building the $60 million, 256-unit Amelia Court at Creative Village mixed-income community.

These projects add to the boom in apartment in the region. Orlando reported a 3.2 percent vacancy rate in the multifamily sector, which is among the lowest for Southeastern cities, according to the most recent report by Charlotte, N.C.-based Real Data Inc. There are more than 11,700 apartments in Central Florida’s construction pipeline, and roughly 30 percent of those units are being built in downtown Orlando.

The average monthly apartment rent for the central submarket, which includes downtown Orlando, is $1,499, up from $1,381 a year ago, Real Data reported. Occupancy rates are expected to remain higher than 95 percent over the next year, well above average among Southeastern cities, which should trigger even more rent growth, according to the report.

UCF Downtown also is expected to bring a major economic impact to the area. The campus is forecast to generate 2,000 jobs and a $205 million economic impact in the next few decades. “There’s a lot of different facets — certainly there’s the economic development aspect of growing our downtown and having the university campus there,” Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer told Orlando Journal. “It’s good for UCF and the students who will have internships and be closer to businesses that are in their majors.”

CoreLogic Home Price Insights – July 2018

 

The CoreLogic Home Price Insights report features an interactive view of our Home Price Index product with analysis through July 2018 with Forecasts from August 2018 including live maps.

CoreLogic HPI™ is designed to provide an early indication of home price trends. The indexes are fully revised with each release and employ techniques to signal turning points sooner.

CoreLogic HPI Forecasts™ (with a thirty-year forecast horizon), project CoreLogic HPI levels for two tiers—Single-Family Combined (both Attached and Detached) and Single-Family Combined excluding distressed sales.

The report is published monthly with coverage at the national, state and Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA)/Metro level and includes home price indices (including distressed sale); home price forecast and market condition indicators. The data incorporates more than 40 years of repeat-sales transactions for analyzing home price trends.

July 2018 National Home Prices
Home prices nationwide, including distressed sales, increased year over year by 6.2 percent in July 2018 compared with July 2017 and increased month over month by 0.3 percent in July 2018 compared with June 2018 (revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results).

Forecast Prices Nationally
The CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicates that home prices will increase by 5.1 percent on a year-over-year basis from July 2018 to July 2019, and on month-over-month basis home prices are expected to decrease slightly by 0.2 from July 2018 to August 2018.

The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state.

Central Florida’s 25 Wealthiest ZIP Codes

What’s the value of your home? What college degrees do you have? What’s your household income? What type of work do you do?”

Why so many nosey questions, you might ask?

Well, these were just a few of the key indicators behind creating American City Business Journal’s Wealth Index Score.

To determine which ZIP codes are Central Florida’s most affluent, Buffalo Business Journal Projects Editor Scott Thomas created a methodology exclusive to American City Business Journals. To see where your ZIP code ranks among Central Florida’s wealthiest, according to ACBJ’s Wealth Index

Orlando 32814
Orlando 32814
$101,628 Orange 7,477 31.70%
2 Windermere-34786
Orange Country
Windermere 34786
$91,884 Orange 34,328 27.80%
3 Oviedo-32766
Seminole County
Oviedo 32766
$90,208 Seminole 15,905 20.00%
4 Longwood-32779
Seminole County
Longwood 32779
$83,695 Seminole 30,400 23.40%
5 Orlando-32827
Orange County
Orlando 32827
$81,089 Orange 7,650 17.60%
6 Orlando-32832
Orange
Orlando 32832
$76,281 Orange 18,216 12.70%
7 Lake Mary-32746
Seminole County
Lake Mary 32746
$75,966 Seminole 41,247 15.90%
8 Orlando-32836
Orange County
Orlando 32836
$72,143 Orange 18,351 28.20%
9 Sorrento
Sorrento 32776
$69,417 Lake 11,049 8.30%
10 Maitland-32751
Orange County
Maitland 32751
$68,505 Orange 21,620 17.70%
11 Montverde
Lake County
Montverde 34756
$67,552 Lake 3,548 17.60%
12 Orlando-32804
Orange County
Orlando 32804
$66,811 Orange 17,565 14.60%
13 Oviedo
Oviedo 32765
$66,675 Seminole 60,485 14.80%
14 Orlando-32828
Orange County
Orlando 32828
$64,212 Orange 61,636 13.20%
15 Winter Park-32789
Orange County
Winter Park 32789
$64,173 Orange 25,039 23.70%
16 Longwood-32750
Longwood 32750
$62,857 Seminole 22,903 9.00%
17 Eustis-32736
Eustis 32736
$62,698 Lake 9,342 10.20%
18 Apopka-32712
Orange County
Apopka 32712
$62,272 Orange 44,222 11.60%
19 Orlando-32819
Orange County
Orlando 32819
$62,251 Orange 27,248 16.90%
20 Kissimmee-34747
Osceola County
Kissimmee 34747
$62,240 Osceola 15,940 11.70%
21 Winter Springs-32708
Seminole County
Winter Springs 32708
$61,813 Seminole 43,715 13.90%
22 St. Cloud
St. Cloud 34772
$61,674 Osceola 27,889 7.10%
23 Orlando 32829
Orlando 32829
$60,966 Orange 19,965 5.00%
24 Winter Garden-34787
Orange County
Winter Garden 34787
$60,208 Orange 53,496 13.40%
25 Clermont-34711
Lake County
Clermont 34711
$59,958 Lake 55,510 7.20%

The 25 highest-paying jobs in the U.S.

 

Tech jobs make up 13 of the 25 highest-paying jobs in America for 2018, up from 11 in 2017, according to a new ranking from the job and recruiting site Glassdoor.

There are five health-care jobs on this year’s ranking, down from six in 2017, Glassdoor said. The top three jobs are all in health care.

“The fact that employers are paying top dollar for many techs and healthcare jobs reinforces how demand for these valuable skill sets continues to outpace the supply of talent with these experts,” Amanda Stansell, economic research analyst for Glassdoor, said in a prepared statement. “We know that salary matters a lot to job seekers when determining where to work, but it should not be the only factor to consider.”

Eight job titles are new to the ranking this year, including nurse practitioner, which has the highest number of current job openings at 14,931 positions.

Scroll through the accompanying gallery to see the 25 highest-paying jobs for 2018.

For a job title to be considered for this list, it must receive at least 100 salary reports shared (with Glassdoor) by U.S.-based employees over the past year through June 30, according to the site. Glassdoor also applies a statistical algorithm to estimate annual median base pay in order to control for factors like location and seniority.

Salary information hub Payscale.com provided us with a list of the 25 top-paid positions in the U.S. technology sector.

From database architect to a principal product manager and many jobs in between, the data provided to us show the median pay for a variety of tech titles in the U.S.

The median (50th percentile) pay is the annual total cash compensation in the U.S. — half the people doing the job earn more than the median, and half earn less.

The information shows the highest paid individual contributor, or non-management, roles in the technology sector.

Orlando Developer Starts plans for Large Development

 

 

Unicorp ’s most prominent developer is pursuing its latest $200 million projects in an area that’s heating up for retail developers — and that represents a major shift in the market.

That’s according to Jorge Rodriguez, executive managing director at Colliers International Central , who is representing Orlando-based Unicorp National Developments Inc. in the purchase of a roughly 150-acre site in Daytona Beach’s fast-developing area of Interstate 95 and LPGA Boulevard.

“[Historically], all the retail was along International Speedway Boulevard,” Rodriguez said. “What’s happening is Daytona’s gotten to the point where there’s no more land to be developed there … It’s jumped north to LPGA and I-95.”

New projects in that area likely will be more attractive to consumers, added John Albright, president, and CEO of Consolidated-Tomoka Land Co. (NYSE: CTO), Daytona Beach’s largest landowner and soon-to-be seller of the site Unicorp has under contract.

In fact, developers have been buying up chunks of land from Consolidated-Tomoka for years, creating a massive economic impact for the community. The largest land sale was to Minto Communities, which partnered with Margaritaville HoldingsInc. to build the $1 billion Jimmy Buffett-themed Latitude Margaritaville — a massive active-adult, the mixed-use community now under .

Additionally, the $91 million, 350,000-square-foot Tanger Outlets opened in 2016, and North American Development Group is anticipating a fall opening of its estimated $80 million, 400,000-square-foot Tomoka Town Center featuring T.J. Maxx, Hobby Lobby, Academy Sports + Outdoors and more.

Since 2011, Consolidated-Tomoka’s land sales in this area have resulted in $1.5 billion in total capital investment in Daytona Beach, adding more than 3,500 jobs, according to company documents.

“You have a large influx of new population, and a great regional draw as far as the interstate and LPGA [Boulevard],” Albright said. “It’s all coming together.”

Meanwhile, Unicorp plans to start construction on its new project in first-quarter 2019. The first 23-acre phase, dubbed Shoppes at Williamson Crossing, will feature about 100,000 square feet of un-anchored shops and restaurants. No tenants have been signed, but Unicorp President Chuck Whittall said his company is in talks with about 30 potential tenants.

Sales of previously owned US Homes update

US HOME SALES DROP TO 2 YEAR LOW
Sales of previously owned U.S. unexpectedly slumped for a fourth month to the weakest in more than two years, signaling higher prices and tight supplies continue to squeeze demand, a National Association of Realtors report showed Wednesday.
HIGHLIGHTS OF EXISTING-HOME SALES (JULY)
• Contract closings fell 0.7% m/m to a 5.34m annual rate (est. 5.4m), the slowest pace since Feb. 2016, after unrevised 5.38m
• Median sales price increased 4.5% y/y to $269,600
• Inventory of available properties unchanged y/y at 1.92mKey Takeaways
The report adds to other recent signs of cooling in real estate markets. Prospective home buyers are increasingly discouraged by rising borrowing costs and property-price increases that are outpacing wage growth. The share of Americans who say it’s a good time to buy a home fell in August to 63 percent, the smallest since 2008, the University of Michigan consumer sentiment survey showed on Friday.

Continuing declines in purchases of single-family homes and cheaper properties suggest that the market is being supported by an increasing concentration of activity among those with higher income and financial assets.

The slump was led by an 8.3 percent decline in the Northeast, while the South and Midwest also decreased. Sales rose in the West.

Official’s Views
The decline in sales “has been a slow drip, and the is the same story, where we’re lacking inventory,” Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said at a press briefing accompanying the report.

Other Details
• At the current pace, it would take 4.3 months to sell the homes on the market, unchanged from the prior month; Realtors group considers less than five months’ supply consistent with a tight market
• Single-family home sales fell 0.2 percent to an annual rate of 4.75 million
• Purchases of condominium and co-op units dropped 4.8 percent to a 590,000 pace
• First-time buyers made up 32 percent of all sales, compared with 31 percent in the prior month
• Homes were on the market for an average 27 days, compared with 26 days in June
• 55 percent of homes sold in July were on market for less than a month, NAR said
• Existing home sales account for 90 percent of the market and are calculated when a contract closes; new home sales, considered a timelier indicator though their share is only about 10 percent, are tabulated when contracts get signed

BY: Jeff Kearns and Katia Dmitrieva

Lake Nona global biotech firm to build facility, create 300+ high-wage jobs

City Council approved a nearly $380,000 incentive deal Aug. 20 for a Biotech and biopharmaceutical firm to build a major manufacturing plant in .

Cranbury, N.J.-based Amicus Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: FOLD) wants to build a 190,690-square-foot facility — its first biologic drug substance manufacturing plant with associated research and development in Lake Nona. The company will create 316 jobs in Orlando by Dec. 31, 2024. The jobs will pay an average annual wage of $69,670.

Amicus’s total capital investment is $148.85 million to $180 million in and equipment, according to Orlando city council documents. Under ‘s Qualified Target Industry program, the state will provide a total of $1.9 million to Amicus. Orlando will provide 20 percent of the full amount over an eight-year period.

However, the project is not a done deal, yet. In addition to Orlando, the company is considering other states for this project, but the incentives help sweeten the pot for Amicus to choose this area. Orange County also may kick in funding for the project and will decide whether or not to today, Aug. 21, during its commissioners’ meeting.

District 1 City Commissioner Jim Gray agreed that getting Amicus would be a good move for the city. “We are thrilled to welcome Amicus to the southeast part of town,” Gray said during the Aug. 20 city council meeting. “This is exactly what we are trying to attract — an established company with a great reputation bringing some talented smart people and paying them a lot to do their job.”

Tavistock Development Co.’s Lake Nona is a fast-growing southeast Orlando community that already employs about 5,000 people in its 650-acre life sciences hub. Lake Nona notched the No. 15 spot among the nation’s top-selling master-planned communities with 523 home sales in 2017, John Burns Real Estate Consulting reported.

In addition, Lake Nona’s daytime population continues to grow with its Medical City life sciences hub and future developments such as New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP’s $430 million, 55-acre training facility being built on Lake Nona Boulevard. The community already boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees and more than 11,000 students at its schools.