New office space slated for Lake Nona Town Center

By Jack Witthaus  – Staff Writer, Journal

The Orlando-based developer, Tavistock Development Co. is planning for a new 120,000-square-foot office building in the Lake Nona Town Center. It’s the third office project in the $780 million, 3.8 million-square-foot, mixed-use town center that is developing in partnership with Columbus, Ohio-based Steiner + Associates.

is expected to begin before the end of the year.

“Leasing for the building is going very well,” Senior Sales and Leasing Associate Ginger Vetter said in a statement about the second building, which has yet to open. “We expect to announce another regional headquarters and other tenants soon. With the momentum from this building, we’re moving forward with another new, Class A office building.”

The third building’s general contractor is Barton Malow Co., and the architect is a partnership between Gensler and HuntonBrady Architects. Tavistock spokesperson Karlee Kunkle declined to say whether or not a tenant had been signed for the third building or what percentage of the second building has been leased.

The third building’s revelation comes after the second building — an estimated $20 million, Class A 155,000-square-foot, six-story office building at the southwest corner of Veteran’s Way and Boulevard — topped out in March. The second building, called Town Center Office II, is part of the town center’s $300 million Phase 2A. The building was slated to be completed by the end of this year.

So far, BBA Aviation Plc., parent company to Signature Flight Support in Orlando, has signed a 65,000-square-foot lease inside Town Center Office II.

It’s no surprise that there’s interest in the airport/Lake Nona office submarket as average Class A office rents are $30.18 per square foot — the highest in Central and ahead of Orlando’s average of $25.93 per square foot, Cushman & Wakefield (NYSE: CWK) reported. Part of the demand for office space might have to do with Lake Nona’s growing Medical City, which could be spurring other businesses to relocate to the area to serve that new employment base, said Nicole Barry, vice president and director of operations at Tower Realty Partners Inc.

Meanwhile, construction continues on the second phase of Lake Nona Town CenterOrlando Business Journal previously learned about three dozen major retailers — from American Eagle Outfitters (NYSE: AEO) to Dick’s Sporting Goods (NYSE: DKS) — are lining up for a spot inside the town center. Tavistock wouldn’t confirm any of the potential retailers as tenants, but the company recently announced that Dallas-based cinema Cinepolis USA will open a nine-screen, 40,000-square-foot cinema in 2020 in the town center.

The fast-growing community in southeast Orlando boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees and 14,000-plus students at its schools.

Tavistock buys 1,000-plus acres airport land

is expanding its boundaries south of and it now owns the land it needs.

Lake Nona developer Tavistock Development Co. LLC’s related entity TDCP LLC spent $63.9 million, or roughly $55,700 per acre, on May 10 for nearly 1,147 acres south of Orlando International Airport from the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority and the city of Orlando, Orange County records showed.

The three different parcels, two in Orange County and one in Osceola County along Narcoossee and Boggy Creek roads, will be used by  to develop a portion of a mixed-use project west of Narcoossee Road, north and east of Boggy Creek Road near the Orlando VA Medical Center, Tavistock spokeswoman Jessi Blakley told Orlando Journal.

The project, known as the Poitras planned development, includes:

  • 2,973
  • 100,000 square feet of commercial use
  • A school on 25 acres

Tavistock previously sought approval from the city earlier this month to rezone the property as a planned development with aircraft noise.

The 11,000-acre Lake Nona already has billions of dollars worth of underway and there’s even more growth ahead.

UCF Lake Nona Medical Center CEO

By   – Staff Writer, Orlando Journal
 Updated 

The University of Central Florida’s planned teaching hospital, dubbed Medical Center, now has a CEO.

Central Florida Regional Hospital CEO Wendy Brandon will take on the role Jan. 1. The proposed 100-bed hospital is expected to be completed by 2020.

“Wendy is a seasoned, dynamic leader who has played a pivotal role in our partnership with at Lake Nona, and we are excited to have her lead our newest hospital in the Central Florida region,” HCA Healthcare’s North Florida Division President Michael P. Joyce said in a prepared statement. “Under her leadership, we will advance health care in Lake Nona , improve quality of life for the community and provide education that ignites careers in medicine at UCF Lake Nona Medical Center.”

Brandon has been CEO for HCA Healthcare Inc’s (NYSE: HCA) 221-bed Central Florida Regional Hospital in Sanford for the past 10 years, with accomplishments including the launch of the hospital’s Level II trauma center and the development of Oviedo Medical Center. She earned a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Tennessee at Martin and her MBA from Belmont University. She also has leadership roles with several organizations, including the Orlando Economic Partnership Board, CareerSource Central Florida Board, the Sanford Rotary Club and Seminole County Regional Chamber of Commerce Board.

The center will create 302 high-wage jobs, with salaries ranging from $60,000 to $600,000, and has the potential to retain some Sanford Burnham researchers.

Along with the hospital, UCF plans to add more developments as it moves its colleges of nursing and medicine to the campus. University partner Alter+Care will design and develop a 150,000-square-foot building, which will include 90,000 square feet for the College of Nursing and 60,000 square feet for expansion and future Academic Health Sciences Center use at the campus. Those projects are targeted to open by spring 2022.

In addition, Lake Nona’s daytime population continues to grow with its Medical City life sciences hub and future developments such as New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP’s $430 million, 55-acre training facility being built on Lake Nona Boulevard. The community already boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees and more than 11,000 students at its schools.

It will be built in Medical City near Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, a facility UCF is set to take over as La Jolla, Calif.-based Sanford Burnham winds down its Florida operations.

The university received approval in August to take over the 175,000-square-foot Sanford Burnham research facility. The public research university closed on the existing facility Aug. 27, with Sanford Burnham occupying the building until Nov. 30. The university will begin doing research there by March 1.

UCF wants to turn the facility into a cancer research and treatment center with partner organizations such as Knoxville, Tenn.-based Provision Healthcare LLC, and HCA’s Sarah Cannon Research Institute LLC. UCF has projected its plan will result in a $578 million economic output after five years of operations.

“It’s fantastic for a couple of reasons,” UCF President Dale Whittaker previously told Orlando Business Journal. “One is it creates a private investment in the community, it gives us an additional treatment option, which is fairly unique in the community as well as significant clinical research. Sarah Cannon has been involved with almost 75 percent of the cancer research drugs that have been approved recently, so this is a nationally very powerful clinical research organization added to our university-level basic research.”

 

Lake Nona to land big biotech facility

By   – Staff Writer, Journal

Before dirt even has been tossed, a future biotech manufacturing plant in ’s 650-acre is dreaming up expansion plans.

The 18-acre site — likely slated for Cranbury, N.J.-based global tech and biopharmaceutical company Amicus TherapeuticsInc. (Nasdaq: FOLD) — already is being considered for a planned development with manufacturing, office and warehouse space.

And it may include a future phase to accommodate additional parking, office space and a lab area, city of Orlando project planner Wes Shaffer said at a Sept. 13 meeting.

Amicus executives haven’t responded to requests for comment. However, an unnamed company behind “Project Olympus” this month received a city committee approval to build a 200,700-square-foot development at the southwest corner of Laureate Boulevard and Medical City Drive. Real estate sources said Amicus likely is the company behind Project Olympus.

Additionally, Amicus reportedly also was considering other cities for a new facility, but the Orlando City Council approved a nearly $380,000 incentive deal Aug. 20 to attract the company to Central Florida.

The facility would be the first biologic drug substance manufacturing plant with associated research and development in Lake Nona. It’s a major win not only for Orlando but also for Lake Nona, which already is home to the Orlando VA Medical Center, Nemours Children’s Hospital and the University of Central Florida medical school, among others.

“The fact that an innovative business such as Amicus is considering Orlando to build the first biologic drug substance manufacturing plant solidifies Medical City’s ability to attract new and innovative companies,” city spokeswoman Jessica Garcia said.

The new facility would add to a bevy of industrial activity nearby as part of the airport/Lake Nona submarket, one of the largest in the Orlando area.

Lake Nona global biotech firm to build facility, create 300+ high-wage jobs

City Council approved a nearly $380,000 incentive deal Aug. 20 for a Biotech and biopharmaceutical firm to build a major manufacturing plant in .

Cranbury, N.J.-based Amicus Therapeutics Inc. (Nasdaq: FOLD) wants to build a 190,690-square-foot facility — its first biologic drug substance manufacturing plant with associated research and development in Lake Nona. The company will create 316 jobs in Orlando by Dec. 31, 2024. The jobs will pay an average annual wage of $69,670.

Amicus’s total capital investment is $148.85 million to $180 million in and equipment, according to Orlando city council documents. Under ‘s Qualified Target Industry program, the state will provide a total of $1.9 million to Amicus. Orlando will provide 20 percent of the full amount over an eight-year period.

However, the project is not a done deal, yet. In addition to Orlando, the company is considering other states for this project, but the incentives help sweeten the pot for Amicus to choose this area. Orange County also may kick in funding for the project and will decide whether or not to today, Aug. 21, during its commissioners’ meeting.

District 1 City Commissioner Jim Gray agreed that getting Amicus would be a good move for the city. “We are thrilled to welcome Amicus to the southeast part of town,” Gray said during the Aug. 20 city council meeting. “This is exactly what we are trying to attract — an established company with a great reputation bringing some talented smart people and paying them a lot to do their job.”

Tavistock Development Co.’s Lake Nona is a fast-growing southeast Orlando community that already employs about 5,000 people in its 650-acre life sciences hub. Lake Nona notched the No. 15 spot among the nation’s top-selling master-planned communities with 523 home sales in 2017, John Burns Real Estate Consulting reported.

In addition, Lake Nona’s daytime population continues to grow with its Medical City life sciences hub and future developments such as New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP’s $430 million, 55-acre training facility being built on Lake Nona Boulevard. The community already boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees and more than 11,000 students at its schools.

University of Central Florida (UCF) approved for Sanford Burnham asset takeover

 

Good morning, Orlando.

The University of Central Florida  () took one step closer to taking over the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s assets in Lake Nona’s .

The public research university got unanimous approval during the Aug. 20 Orlando City Council meeting to take over the 175,000-square-foot facility. The Orange County Board of County Commissioners and the UCF board of trustees next need to sign off on the agreements, both expected to happen on Aug. 21. The Sanford Burnham board approved the exchange Aug. 14. according to Sanford Burnham spokeswoman Susan Gammon.

UCF would close the deal on Aug. 27, with Sanford Burnham occupying the building until Nov. 30 in accordance with a lease agreement separate from the funding partners, according to Gammon. The city had presented a timeline during its meeting where UCF would close on the facility by Sept. 1. The university would begin conducting research there by March 1, 2019.

The proposed deal would have UCF paying Orange County, the city, and Lake Nona Land Co. LLC, an entity of Development Co., a total of $50 million over a period not to exceed 30 years, according to city documents. The university is set to pay $2 million per year over the first 20 years to the three funding partners proportionally to their involvement and $1 million per year over the last 10 years.

The center will create 302 high-wage jobs, with salaries ranging from $60,000 to $600,000, and has the potential to retain some Sanford Burnham researchers.

In 2006, the state approved more than $155 million to incentivize the Sanford Burnham institute’s expansion to Florida and required a match by local partners at least equal to that amount, making the total economic package in excess of $300 million committed by Orange County, the city of Orlando and Lake Nona Land Co. Lake Nona developer Tavistock Group had committed $17.6 million as part of the deal, plus 12 acres.

The institute promised to create 303 jobs by the 10th year of operation. But since then, the facility has struggled as federal research grants became scarcer in recent years. By year 10, the institute had created 87 percent of the jobs it had promised.

Sanford Burnham announced in February it would return $12.3 million in state funds before it vacated the facility. Sanford Burnham previously told Orlando Business Journal the $12.3 million is comprised of $10.8 million of unused equipment funds in Sanford Burnham’s possession and $1.5 million in a state escrow account.

UCF-HCA joint venture secure more land for Lake Nona teaching hospital

 

is putting more property into play for a new teaching hospital it’s building with Hospital Corp. of America in ‘s .

The UCF Board of Trustees on June 20 approved assigning UCF’s option to buy an 11.4-acre site on Lake Nona Boulevard — which is adjacent the 25-acre parcel already set aside for the UCF Lake Nona Medical Center teaching hospital — to Central Health Services, a joint venture between UCF and Nashville, Tenn.-based HCA (NYSE: HCA). The option, which is set to expire on June 25, would allow completion of the planned hospital campus and facilitate future growth, documents showed.

Central Florida Health Services would buy that parcel for about $6.8 million, or $600,000 per acre, from Development Co. LLC’s related Lake Nona Land Co., documents showed. The land is now appraised at about $10.4 million, according to Orange County records.

The purchase is expected to close by the end of June.

“We are thankful to the trustees for giving us this opportunity to acquire more land for the UCF Lake Nona Medical Center. The approval provides space for a growing hospital – and more equity for UCF,” UCF College of Medicine Dean Dr. Deborah German told  Journal in an emailed response. “We are eager to open this university hospital for our community, patients, physicians, researchers, and learners.”

The first phase of on the 100-bed UCF Lake Nona Medical Center is set to start on Oct. 25, and the property will open in 2020 next to the UCF Health Sciences Campus, between the UCF College of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona. UCF plans to take over the Sanford Burnham’s assets once the institute vacates the property.

The university also is considering relocating its nursing college to Medical City.

Meanwhile, the new UCF Lake Nona Medical Center will help fulfill German’s goal of creating an environment that includes a great hospital affiliated with a top-notch medical school. The hospital will be a living/learning lab for training medical, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy and social work students in teamwork skills and communication.

“If you’re sick and have exhausted all the treatments of your local hospital, where do you go for the next level of care? Many people say Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, Cleveland Clinic. All of those are teaching hospitals,” German previously said.

The UCF Lake Nona Medical Center also will address a serious statewide lack of doctors. The Teaching Hospital Council of Florida and the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida forecast that the state will have a shortage of 7,000 physician specialists by 2025. UCF started building residency programs a few years ago to address the shortage and now has 255 slots and expects to have more than 560 by 2020 through the partnership with HCA, German has said.

Tavistock buys 1,000-plus acres of Orlando airport land for $64M

Lake Nona is expanding its boundaries south of and it now owns the land it needs.

Lake Nona developer  Development Co. LLC’s related entity TDCP LLC spent $63.9 million, or roughly $55,700 per acre, on May 10 for nearly 1,147 acres south of International Airport from the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority and the city of Orlando, Orange County records showed.

The three different parcels, two in Orange County and one in Osceola County along Narcoossee and Boggy Creek roads, will be used by Tavistock to develop a portion of a mixed-use project west of Narcoossee Road, north and east of Boggy Creek Road near the Orlando VA Medical Center, Tavistock spokeswoman Jessi Blakley told Orlando Business Journal.

The project, known as the Poitras planned development, includes:

  • 2,973
  • 100,000 square feet of commercial use
  • A school on 25 acres

Tavistock previously sought approval from the city earlier this month to rezone the property as a planned development with aircraft noise.

The 11,000-acre Lake Nona already has billions of dollars worth of underway and there’s even more growth ahead. See the photo gallery above for a sampling of Lake Nona projects in the works, and read more from OBJ‘s Doing Business in Lake Nona event from earlier this month.

UCF plans to move its Research Park nursing school

 

The University of Central Florida’s College of Nursing has outgrown its current location in Research Park and the school wants to build it a new home in .

faculty members are seeking approval on May 24 for a concept that will lead to a potential operating lease arrangement for a future Health Sciences and College of Nursing building near the existing College of Medicine.

The change is part of UCF’s plan to create several new colleges by July 2, including an Academic Health Sciences Center and the College of Health Professions & Sciences at Lake Nona, which eventually will include the College of Medicine and the College of Nursing. The goal is to help better organize the campuses to connect students with employers from industries in which they are earning degrees.

A presentation submitted by UCF College of Medicine Dean Dr. Deborah German and UCF College of Nursing Dean Mary Lou Sole says the UCF Real Estate Foundation will sell one of 50 acres of Lake Nona gift land to Alter+Care at fair market value for the project. Alter+Care is an existing partner with UCF that develops and finances health care, educational and outpatient facilities.

The proposed plans say Alter+Care would provide an operating lease for a Health Sciences and College of Nursing building adjacent the College of Medicine.

Alter+Care would design, build and finance a 150,000-square-foot building, with 90,000 square feet for College of Nursing and 60,000 square feet reserved for expansion and future Academic Health Sciences Center use, documents showed.

In exchange, UCF would offer a 25-year lease with renewal options for $17 per square foot, or $2.6 million. UCF will maintain the building, which the university estimated will have $1.5 million in operating expenses.

If the UCF Board of Trustees approves the plans, the next step is for Alter+Care to create schematic drawings of the building and develop the final terms of the operating lease.

  • Develop of schematic drawings and complete due diligence: June-October 2018
  • Finalize operating lease terms: October-December 2018
  • to start: January-June 2020
  • Targeted opening date: Spring semester 2022

The College of Nursing has nearly 3,000 students across three campuses, and colleges are being encouraged to produce even more as the state expects a shortage of 50,000 registered nurses by 2025, according to UCF.

The new college building would join the nearby UCF and Hospital Corp. of America’s (NYSE: HCA) 100-bed teaching hospital, which will be built in Lake Nona and open in 2020.

It also would pair nicely with the existing Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s Lake Nona facility, whose assets UCF is seeking to take over and turn into a cancer research center.

“A campus containing all of UCF’s health-related programs will move one step closer to becoming a global destination for education, research and patient care — the Johns Hopkins of the future, only better,” German previously said regarding UCF’s plans to establish an Academic Health Sciences Center in Lake Nona.

Florida Hospital would invest $100M in Lake Nona’s Sanford Burnham

and Tampa’s H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center have joined forces to compete with the University of Central Florida for an asset transfer agreement of the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona.

Hospital has robust research programs and a commitment to collaboration with top-quality research and biopharma organizations. As a long-time research partner through the Translational Research Institute, Florida Hospital has the experience to leverage the investment that has been made in Sanford Burnham Prebys scientific infrastructure. For these reasons we have engaged with them in discussions to steward the medical research enterprise at Lake Nona into the next phase of operation,” showed documents provided by Sanford Burnham to  Journal.

Florida Hospital essentially would turn the 175,000-square-foot facility that’s winding down operations into a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, which would be a first in Central Florida.

“Our proposal represents a tremendous opportunity to advance cancer care and research in the state of Florida. Florida Hospital and Moffitt Cancer Center are the top two providers of cancer care in the state. Bringing together these two organizations will accelerate the pace of advancements, bringing both hope and life-saving treatments to Central Florida more quickly,” Steven Smith, Florida Hospital senior vice president and chief scientific officer, said in a prepared statement.

The implementation of the designed plan focuses on five core programs that will be modeled on the existing Phase I program at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and include:

  • Basic and translational research: It will allow the hospital to create new methods of care in a research environment and attract biotechnology and biopharmaceutical investments.
  • Precision medicine research clinic: It would convert 10,000 square feet of renovated space for cancer patients, who are at the highest risk of progression or poor response to therapy, to enroll into clinical research protocols.
  • Phase 1 clinical research: It would be a clinical care unit providing access to breakthrough treatments through Phase I clinical trials and research protocols not currently available in Central Florida.
  • Drug discovery: This will bring basic, translational and clinical research at the site to accelerate the discovery-to-treatment process and bring new therapies to patients.
  • A stem cell laboratory: That will have immunotherapy technology to fight against leukemia.

Renovations would begin this year: Upgrades for the stem cell program would take nine months to complete, and renovations for the precision medicine and Phase 1 clinical research programs would take roughly a year to finish.

Florida Hospital estimates the proposed strategy will create at least 205 private sector jobs by the fifth year, and 315 jobs over 10 years. The average base salary of jobs created will be $84,946. Included in the job numbers are 50 of the Sanford Burnham employees who are trained in drug discovery. In addition, eight contracted technical staff members would be retained.

Meanwhile, also wants to turn the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute into a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. Its plan would result in 300-plus high-wage jobs and include more than $85 million in private investment. Read more on UCF’s plan here.

Both Florida Hospital and UCF will present their proposals to the Orange County Commission on Jan. 23.