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UCF Lake Nona Medical Center CEO

By   – Staff Writer, Orlando Journal
 Updated 

The University of Central Florida’s planned teaching hospital, dubbed Medical Center, now has a CEO.

Central Florida Regional Hospital CEO Wendy Brandon will take on the role Jan. 1. The proposed 100-bed hospital is expected to be completed by 2020.

“Wendy is a seasoned, dynamic leader who has played a pivotal role in our partnership with at Lake Nona, and we are excited to have her lead our newest hospital in the Central Florida region,” HCA Healthcare’s North Florida Division President Michael P. Joyce said in a prepared statement. “Under her leadership, we will advance health care in Lake Nona , improve quality of life for the community and provide education that ignites careers in medicine at UCF Lake Nona Medical Center.”

Brandon has been CEO for HCA Healthcare Inc’s (NYSE: HCA) 221-bed Central Florida Regional Hospital in Sanford for the past 10 years, with accomplishments including the launch of the hospital’s Level II trauma center and the development of Oviedo Medical Center. She earned a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Tennessee at Martin and her MBA from Belmont University. She also has leadership roles with several organizations, including the Orlando Economic Partnership Board, CareerSource Central Florida Board, the Sanford Rotary Club and Seminole County Regional Chamber of Commerce Board.

The center will create 302 high-wage jobs, with salaries ranging from $60,000 to $600,000, and has the potential to retain some Sanford Burnham researchers.

Along with the hospital, UCF plans to add more developments as it moves its colleges of nursing and medicine to the campus. University partner Alter+Care will design and develop a 150,000-square-foot building, which will include 90,000 square feet for the College of Nursing and 60,000 square feet for expansion and future Academic Health Sciences Center use at the campus. Those projects are targeted to open by spring 2022.

In addition, Lake Nona’s daytime population continues to grow with its Medical City life sciences hub and future developments such as New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP’s $430 million, 55-acre training facility being built on Lake Nona Boulevard. The community already boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees and more than 11,000 students at its schools.

It will be built in Medical City near Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, a facility UCF is set to take over as La Jolla, Calif.-based Sanford Burnham winds down its Florida operations.

The university received approval in August to take over the 175,000-square-foot Sanford Burnham research facility. The public research university closed on the existing facility Aug. 27, with Sanford Burnham occupying the building until Nov. 30. The university will begin doing research there by March 1.

UCF wants to turn the facility into a cancer research and treatment center with partner organizations such as Knoxville, Tenn.-based Provision Healthcare LLC, and HCA’s Sarah Cannon Research Institute LLC. UCF has projected its plan will result in a $578 million economic output after five years of operations.

“It’s fantastic for a couple of reasons,” UCF President Dale Whittaker previously told Orlando Business Journal. “One is it creates a private investment in the community, it gives us an additional treatment option, which is fairly unique in the community as well as significant clinical research. Sarah Cannon has been involved with almost 75 percent of the cancer research drugs that have been approved recently, so this is a nationally very powerful clinical research organization added to our university-level basic research.”

 

Orlando OKs conditional plan for $107M Creative Village apartment complex

The City Commission today helped move forward two pieces of the planned $1 billion, 68-acre, mixed-used Creative Village in downtown.

The commissioners voted unanimously during the Sept. 4 city council meeting to give conditional approval of a $107 million, 390-unit apartment complex. The Creative Village Design Review Committee still wants to review certain aspects of the apartment project such as the streetscape, parking, architecture, and appearance, before it gets full approval.

The commissioners also gave full approval for a 9,221-square-foot central cooling system building for the planned Downtown, a campus that will be shared by the University of Central Florida and  College The UCF energy plant building will include condenser water pumps and cooling towers located outside the building. The structure will be the only plant for the downtown campus.

The apartment complex is a joint venture between Orlando-based Ustler Development Inc. — whose related Creative Village Development LLC is the master developer of Creative Village — and Coral Gables-based apartment developer The Allen Morris Co. The project is slated for a 1.6-acre site on the southwest corner of Amelia Street and Terry Avenue, which is known as “parcel M,” according to city documents.

Creative Village is expected to attract 8,000 faculty, staff and students when UCF Downtown opens in fall 2019 — two to three times more people than initially anticipated, according to Ustler Development Inc. President Craig Ustler. The number of apartment units was increased from 250 in the previous plan to 390 in July due to that increased demand.

The apartment complex, which could open by mid-2020, will feature mostly studio and one-bedroom units, each with a washer and dryer. The ground floor has a 6,500-square-foot commercial space that may house a food and a social hall. The project also will include a 570-space parking garage, a public courtyard, and a beer garden, said Ustler.

  • Dallas-based Mill Creek Residential Trust plans to build an estimated $59 million-$90 million, 250- to 300-unit market-rate apartment complex on the east side of Central Park.
  • Ustler Development and Development Ventures Group Inc. are underway on a 15-story, $105 million student-housing project with 600 beds and 105,000 square feet of educational space leased to UCF and Valencia College.
  • Winter Park-based Atlantic Housing Partners LLLP is building the $60 million, 256-unit Amelia Court at Creative Village mixed-income community.

These projects add to the boom in apartment in the region. Orlando reported a 3.2 percent vacancy rate in the multifamily sector, which is among the lowest for Southeastern cities, according to the most recent report by Charlotte, N.C.-based Real Data Inc. There are more than 11,700 apartments in Central Florida’s construction pipeline, and roughly 30 percent of those units are being built in downtown Orlando.

The average monthly apartment rent for the central submarket, which includes downtown Orlando, is $1,499, up from $1,381 a year ago, Real Data reported. Occupancy rates are expected to remain higher than 95 percent over the next year, well above average among Southeastern cities, which should trigger even more rent growth, according to the report.

UCF Downtown also is expected to bring a major economic impact to the area. The campus is forecast to generate 2,000 jobs and a $205 million economic impact in the next few decades. “There’s a lot of different facets — certainly there’s the economic development aspect of growing our downtown and having the university campus there,” Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer told Orlando Journal. “It’s good for UCF and the students who will have internships and be closer to businesses that are in their majors.”

University of Central Florida (UCF) approved for Sanford Burnham asset takeover

 

Good morning, Orlando.

The University of Central Florida  () took one step closer to taking over the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s assets in Lake Nona’s .

The public research university got unanimous approval during the Aug. 20 Orlando City Council meeting to take over the 175,000-square-foot facility. The Orange County Board of County Commissioners and the UCF board of trustees next need to sign off on the agreements, both expected to happen on Aug. 21. The Sanford Burnham board approved the exchange Aug. 14. according to Sanford Burnham spokeswoman Susan Gammon.

UCF would close the deal on Aug. 27, with Sanford Burnham occupying the building until Nov. 30 in accordance with a lease agreement separate from the funding partners, according to Gammon. The city had presented a timeline during its meeting where UCF would close on the facility by Sept. 1. The university would begin conducting research there by March 1, 2019.

The proposed deal would have UCF paying Orange County, the city, and Lake Nona Land Co. LLC, an entity of Development Co., a total of $50 million over a period not to exceed 30 years, according to city documents. The university is set to pay $2 million per year over the first 20 years to the three funding partners proportionally to their involvement and $1 million per year over the last 10 years.

The center will create 302 high-wage jobs, with salaries ranging from $60,000 to $600,000, and has the potential to retain some Sanford Burnham researchers.

In 2006, the state approved more than $155 million to incentivize the Sanford Burnham institute’s expansion to Florida and required a match by local partners at least equal to that amount, making the total economic package in excess of $300 million committed by Orange County, the city of Orlando and Lake Nona Land Co. Lake Nona developer Tavistock Group had committed $17.6 million as part of the deal, plus 12 acres.

The institute promised to create 303 jobs by the 10th year of operation. But since then, the facility has struggled as federal research grants became scarcer in recent years. By year 10, the institute had created 87 percent of the jobs it had promised.

Sanford Burnham announced in February it would return $12.3 million in state funds before it vacated the facility. Sanford Burnham previously told Orlando Business Journal the $12.3 million is comprised of $10.8 million of unused equipment funds in Sanford Burnham’s possession and $1.5 million in a state escrow account.

Cinépolis USA will open a nine-screen, 40,000-square-foot cinema in 2020 in the town center

 

 

Theatre

A Dallas-based cinema has pressed play on a new theater in the $780 million Town Center, one of the biggest developments underway in southeast .

Cinépolis USA will open a nine-screen, 40,000-square-foot cinema in 2020 in the town center, according to Tavistock Development Co. LLC. Orlando-based  currently is working on the town center’s $300 million second phase.

It’s the second Cinépolis in Central after the company opened a theater in Winter Garden earlier this month.

Ticket prices typically range from $10-$18 for adults and $8-$14 for children.

Outside of Cinépolis, Lake Nona Town Center’s second phase also will feature a brewery, comedy club and live performance venue, bowling concept, a 215-room luxury hotel and more than 80 restaurants and shops.

“Cinépolis is the entertainment centerpiece for the next phase of the Lake Nona Town Center,” Jim Zboril, president of Tavistock Development Co., said in a prepared statement. “The theater experience is exceptional and epitomizes the quality guests can expect when visiting the town center.

About 37 major retailers are interested in opening shops inside the development. Those retailers range from American Eagle Outfitters (NYSE: AEO) to Dick’s Sporting Goods (NYSE: DKS). Tavistock hasn’t confirmed any of the potential retailers as tenants.

Retail interest in Lake Nona shouldn’t be a surprise since population growth — as evidenced by home sales — drives retail. Lake Nona notched the No. 15 spot among the nation’s top-selling master-planned communities with 523 home sales in 2017, John Burns Real Estate Consulting reported.

In addition, Lake Nona’s daytime population continues to grow with its 650-acre life sciences hub and future developments such as New York-based audit giant KPMG LLP’s $430 million, 55-acre training facility being built on Lake Nona Boulevard, and the teaching hospital being built by University of Central Florida-Hospital Corp. of America (NYSE: HCA).

Residents in Lake Nona often have higher wages and live in pricier than the average Orlando resident. Lake Nona household income was $143,500 in 2017, nearly three times Orange County’s average household income of $49,391, according to Orange County Property Appraiser Rick Singh. And that is attractive to major retailers.

“The market as a whole in Lake Nona has only gotten better and continues to get better,” retail expert Jorge Rodriguez, executive managing director in Central Florida of Colliers International

Why KPMG and USTA built a home in Orlando’s Lake Nona

Located just ten minutes from International Airport sits , one of the nation’s fastest-growing communities on a mission to support a holistically healthy living. Lake Nona encompasses over 13,000 residents and more than 10 million square feet of residential and commercial facilities, including the University of Central Florida () College of Medicine and Nemours Children’s Hospital.20170506_NONA_0005-blog
Aerial view of the Lake Nona community, ten minutes from Orlando International Aiport.

Companies have been attracted to Lake Nona for its extensive land options, proximity to Orlando International Airport, groundbreaking gigabit fiber optic technology (named one of only nine Iconic Smart + Connected communities in the world) and all-inclusive community amenities.

In 2018, the United States Tennis Association (USTA) celebrated a one-year anniversary for its new “Home for American Tennis” at Lake Nona. ’s new Home for American Tennis is the biggest and most innovative facility of its kind in the world, with revolutionary technology built into its 100 outdoor tennis courts – recording training data that coaches and professionals from around the country can take back to their communities.

IMG_3050-blog
USTA’s National Campus in Orlando.

USTA needed a location that would supply enough space for its 63-acre facility and embody the principles of the association. USTA not only found the land it needed to build its new Home in Lake Nona; it found a collaborative community that embraces its mission of inspiring human performance. And by partnering with UCF, Visit Orlando and Visit Florida, USTA felt confident that it could fill its stands at its national and international tournaments.

“It became clear early on that Orlando was our new home because this is an exciting, energetic place to be,” Gordon Smith, Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer of USTA.

In 2017, KPMG began on its new global learning, development and innovation facility. As KPMG’s largest capital investment ever, it was imperative for KPMG to find a location that fit a long list of important criteria: the right culture, climate, community partnerships, incentives, transportation and more. KPMG needed a place that would foster an innovative and collaborative environment for employee training. KPMG considered 49 potential cities including Chicago, Atlanta, and Dallas before choosing Orlando.

KPMG-learning-facility-blog
Rendering of KPMG’s new global training center.

Orlando’s Lake Nona met and exceeded KPMG’s criteria for their largest capital investment project ever. Not only did the city’s future-forward vision resonate with KPMG, but the company was able to fly directly to 90 percent of its other office locations from Orlando International Airport.

“One of the key factors in choosing Orlando was the innovation we see here,” KPMG’s U.S. Chair and CEO Lynne Doughtie said. “The Lake Nona area is known for innovation, and that factor was lacking in many other cities we considered. Of course, all the recreational opportunities in the area are also a big draw.”

KPMG’s $400 million learning, development, and innovation facility in Orlando is scheduled to be complete by the end of 2019.

Industry leaders sound off on Orlando’s high-tech disconnect

Tom Baptiste wants to see more connectivity between the area’s three segmented high-tech industry hubs.

The president and CEO of the -based National Center for Simulation described how downtown’s startups launch innovative ideas, the University of Central Florida area in east Orlando attracts plenty of for large defense contractors, and the theme park-area helps birth a lot of cool technology, too. But there’s nothing bridging those three regions.

“We need to communicate more,” Baptiste said, adding that he just joined the Orlando Tech Association board to try to change that. “There’s downtown Orlando, a tourist piece in the west and there is a high-tech piece in the east, and they never touch. Why I just don’t know. You’ve got the second largest university in America out there on the east side with the simulation industry [in the 1,000-acre Central Florida Research Park], but it just seems like we are missing something in tying together all of the technology that metro Orlando has.”

Baptiste joined 11 other leaders on July 9 for Orlando Business Journal‘s Technology Industry Outlook at Lynx’s downtown headquarters. The executives discussed a variety of topics, including what Central Florida’s tech industry is doing well — including the success of research park and its big employers like Lockheed Martin Corp. (NYSE: LMT), JHT Corp. and Northrop Grumman Corp. (NYSE: NOC) — and what the region needs to improve. Here’s what they had to say:

Brenda Prenitzer, CEO, and founder, NanoSpective Inc.: “A gap or void that I see in the area is hardware. We are very strong in apps and programming and simulation, but we don’t seem to have a strong manufacturing hardware sector. I spent some time in Silicon Valley and something I heard from some of the workers there is that it’s an artificial environment and it is a wonderland. People are craving someplace other than Silicon Valley to do business and I think hardware is an opportunity for us.”

Suneera Madhani, CEO, and founder, Fattmerchant Inc.:“Another opportunity for our technology scene is the connection between the startups and the business world. Those two sectors are not talking to each other. We have some really great things happening in the startup world and we have so many great large corporations, but startups are not getting the opportunity to work with large corporations that can take innovation to the next level.”

Bob Kilmer, training and logistics solutions vice president of engineering and technology, Lockheed Martin Rotary & Mission Systems: “Florida does have a very good business environment. Florida supports our initiatives and we have a great partnership with . Orlando has a diverse where we do have the tourism that helps offset when things ebb and flow. The struggle that I see is the people. As we continue to grow — we’ve doubled our workforce in the last four years — we’re getting all the talent pool that’s here, so now we are having to go outside Orlando to try to bring in more talent. It is surprisingly difficult to get people to come.”

UCF-HCA joint venture secure more land for Lake Nona teaching hospital

 

is putting more property into play for a new teaching hospital it’s building with Hospital Corp. of America in ‘s .

The UCF Board of Trustees on June 20 approved assigning UCF’s option to buy an 11.4-acre site on Lake Nona Boulevard — which is adjacent the 25-acre parcel already set aside for the UCF Lake Nona Medical Center teaching hospital — to Central Health Services, a joint venture between UCF and Nashville, Tenn.-based HCA (NYSE: HCA). The option, which is set to expire on June 25, would allow completion of the planned hospital campus and facilitate future growth, documents showed.

Central Florida Health Services would buy that parcel for about $6.8 million, or $600,000 per acre, from Development Co. LLC’s related Lake Nona Land Co., documents showed. The land is now appraised at about $10.4 million, according to Orange County records.

The purchase is expected to close by the end of June.

“We are thankful to the trustees for giving us this opportunity to acquire more land for the UCF Lake Nona Medical Center. The approval provides space for a growing hospital – and more equity for UCF,” UCF College of Medicine Dean Dr. Deborah German told  Journal in an emailed response. “We are eager to open this university hospital for our community, patients, physicians, researchers, and learners.”

The first phase of on the 100-bed UCF Lake Nona Medical Center is set to start on Oct. 25, and the property will open in 2020 next to the UCF Health Sciences Campus, between the UCF College of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at Lake Nona. UCF plans to take over the Sanford Burnham’s assets once the institute vacates the property.

The university also is considering relocating its nursing college to Medical City.

Meanwhile, the new UCF Lake Nona Medical Center will help fulfill German’s goal of creating an environment that includes a great hospital affiliated with a top-notch medical school. The hospital will be a living/learning lab for training medical, nursing, physical therapy, pharmacy and social work students in teamwork skills and communication.

“If you’re sick and have exhausted all the treatments of your local hospital, where do you go for the next level of care? Many people say Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Stanford, Cleveland Clinic. All of those are teaching hospitals,” German previously said.

The UCF Lake Nona Medical Center also will address a serious statewide lack of doctors. The Teaching Hospital Council of Florida and the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida forecast that the state will have a shortage of 7,000 physician specialists by 2025. UCF started building residency programs a few years ago to address the shortage and now has 255 slots and expects to have more than 560 by 2020 through the partnership with HCA, German has said.

UCF plans to move its Research Park nursing school

 

The University of Central Florida’s College of Nursing has outgrown its current location in Research Park and the school wants to build it a new home in .

faculty members are seeking approval on May 24 for a concept that will lead to a potential operating lease arrangement for a future Health Sciences and College of Nursing building near the existing College of Medicine.

The change is part of UCF’s plan to create several new colleges by July 2, including an Academic Health Sciences Center and the College of Health Professions & Sciences at Lake Nona, which eventually will include the College of Medicine and the College of Nursing. The goal is to help better organize the campuses to connect students with employers from industries in which they are earning degrees.

A presentation submitted by UCF College of Medicine Dean Dr. Deborah German and UCF College of Nursing Dean Mary Lou Sole says the UCF Real Estate Foundation will sell one of 50 acres of Lake Nona gift land to Alter+Care at fair market value for the project. Alter+Care is an existing partner with UCF that develops and finances health care, educational and outpatient facilities.

The proposed plans say Alter+Care would provide an operating lease for a Health Sciences and College of Nursing building adjacent the College of Medicine.

Alter+Care would design, build and finance a 150,000-square-foot building, with 90,000 square feet for College of Nursing and 60,000 square feet reserved for expansion and future Academic Health Sciences Center use, documents showed.

In exchange, UCF would offer a 25-year lease with renewal options for $17 per square foot, or $2.6 million. UCF will maintain the building, which the university estimated will have $1.5 million in operating expenses.

If the UCF Board of Trustees approves the plans, the next step is for Alter+Care to create schematic drawings of the building and develop the final terms of the operating lease.

  • Develop of schematic drawings and complete due diligence: June-October 2018
  • Finalize operating lease terms: October-December 2018
  • to start: January-June 2020
  • Targeted opening date: Spring semester 2022

The College of Nursing has nearly 3,000 students across three campuses, and colleges are being encouraged to produce even more as the state expects a shortage of 50,000 registered nurses by 2025, according to UCF.

The new college building would join the nearby UCF and Hospital Corp. of America’s (NYSE: HCA) 100-bed teaching hospital, which will be built in Lake Nona and open in 2020.

It also would pair nicely with the existing Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s Lake Nona facility, whose assets UCF is seeking to take over and turn into a cancer research center.

“A campus containing all of UCF’s health-related programs will move one step closer to becoming a global destination for education, research and patient care — the Johns Hopkins of the future, only better,” German previously said regarding UCF’s plans to establish an Academic Health Sciences Center in Lake Nona.

USTA National Campus to expand

The U.S. Tennis Association National Campus revealed that it wants to score more land for a future expansion to its 64-acre Lake Nona campus.

The $100 million campus, the largest tennis training center in the nation, wants to acquire adjacent land from developer Tavistock Development Co. LLC, Kurt Kamperman, the ‘s chief executive for community tennis and the campus, told  Business Journal during the Orange County Property Appraiser’s 2018 State of event on May 9.

was not immediately available for comment.

Kamperman said he’s talking with Tavistock about “trading a few pieces of land” for the expansion and that the newly acquired land would be within 100 yards or so of the existing USTA campus. “We’re working with Tavistock to find some adjacent land that would give us the opportunity to build a small stadium court for events and possibly have additional indoor courts.”

The reason behind the need for more indoor courts is basic: During the rainy season in July and August, the organization has only six indoor courts for people to use, Kamperman said.

Meanwhile, adding a small stadium court/amphitheater will allow the USTA campus to accommodate larger tennis events. “We would like the ability to host the Davis Cup or Fed Cup and the ability to host smaller professional events,” Kamperman said. “It’s not a set plan, but we would like to have that opportunity down the road.”

The campus currently has 100 tennis courts ranging from green clay to hard, acrylic cushion courts, indoor courts and European Terre Davis red clay. It also incorporates smart technology, allowing the players to record and review their movements, mistakes, and training.

Airport exec shares more on Brightline’s timeline, plans

 

 

All Aboard Florida’s -to-Miami Brightline passenger train is making progress with the Orlando International Airport portion of its route.

The $3.5 billion Brightline train will soon be moving into the airport’s Intermodal Terminal Facility where it, along with SunRail and an undetermined light rail, will be housed.

Stan Thornton, Greater Orlando Aviation Authority COO, said the crew will be moving in as early as next week. “They are going to start setting up in their office in the Intermodal Terminal Facility that they’ve been constructing out. Planning and engineering officers are going to be down in there,” said Thornton.

Thornton added that with the latest conversations between the airport and Brightline officials, it looks like they will be ready to start on the property in June/July where there will be physical construction on the airport’s property. “What they’ve told us is that from the time they actually start, they have a 30-month construction schedule to get that done,” Thornton said.

The timeline sets it up for Orlando’s leg to be operational by the end of 2020 or the beginning of 2021. But there’s still a lot of work to do before then.

“They have a lot of work to do for mass grading. They are going to be coming down from State Road 528, and they are going to be coming to our property from past Narcoossee Road through Lake Nona. They start to come on the property on the northern edge underneath Goldenrod Road. All of that has to be mass graded,” Thornton said.

The only part of the route that hasn’t been built out to have rail go underneath it is the Cargo Road interchange with the Jeff Fuqua Boulevard exit to the north. Thornton said there will be a reconstruction of those bridges and ramps in that area so that they can get the train underneath there and continue down underneath the north cross-field taxiway. Plus, there will be a need to fill in the ponds.

The Intermodal Terminal Facility itself is already prepared for Brightline.

However, the first goal of Brightline will be to get its 70-acre Vehicle Maintenance Facility built on Orlando International Airport property. Once that’s up, Brightline can assemble all its locomotives and cars, and work the rail line route back to South Florida.

The entire Brightline route will cover 235 miles.

The train started operations in January connecting from West Palm Beach to Fort Lauderdale.

For a look inside the Brightline train, check out sister paper South Florida Journal‘s gallery.