Tavistock to start construction on its 24,000-acre Sunbridge

Tavistock Sunbridge

  Development Co. LLC has beefed up plans for a portion of its 24,000-acre, cross-county Sunbridge development.

Tavistock may start as early as February on the 2,700-acre Osceola County piece of its future development that crosses the line into Orange County, a spokeswoman told Orlando Journal. The developer is seeking approvals from Osceola County on an updated development plan for that portion of a total of 19,560 acres in future development after winning approvals for a different plan in July 2017.

The current requests before the Osceola County development review committee are for:

  • 3,198 single-family
  • 1,434 apartments
  • 2.5 million square feet of office space
  • 180,430 square feet of civic space
  • 450 hotel rooms
  • Two schools

The county’s development review committee will make a recommendation on the proposal at a Dec. 5 meeting. Approvals typically take months or years as plans can be stalled, delayed or changed for various reasons.

The Osceola County property is south of the Orange County line, east of Narcoossee Road, west of the Econlockhatchee Swamp Preservation Area and north of Nova Road. Homestead, Penn.-based GAI Consultants Inc. is the master planner.

Master infrastructure construction was expected to start sometime in 2018, Richard Levey, managing director of Levey Consulting, which was representing Tavistock Development on approvals for the development, previously told OBJ. Levey couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

Meanwhile, construction on Sunbridge, one of the largest developments acreage-wise in Central , is expected to continue through 2055. Orange County’s 5,000-acre portion of Sunbridge is slated to include more than 7,300 homes, 490 hotel rooms, 6.3 million square feet of office and retail space, and 2.9 million square feet of industrial space.

The land is owned by entities related to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, according to Osceola County documents.

For developments such as Sunbridge to find success, they require enormous amounts of capital and time to create a sense of place to attract residents, said local land expert Trevor Hall Jr., who isn’t involved in the project. Developers need to build medical, education, industrial and office buildings to serve future residents. “Whatever employment you can generate then feeds absorption of the housing projects.”

Sunbridge is expected to create big business and job opportunities similar to Tavistock’s in southeast Orlando. The 17-square-mile Lake Nona boasts more than 11,000 residents, 5,000 employees in the 650-acre biotech hub, and 14,000-plus students at its schools.